Category Archive: Uncategorized

  1. Bringing Manufacturing Back, One Development at a Time

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    Last month, the San Francisco Planning Commission approved the construction the first new manufacturing facility to break ground in nearly twenty years. 100 Hooper is centrally located in San Francisco’s SoMa District, and will convert a storage and truck rental site into a 427,000 square foot campus, comprised of manufacturing facilities and office space. A stand-alone building will serve as the headquarters for SF Made, a non-profit dedicated to developing the local manufacturing sector. (more…)

  2. Big Data, Small Lending, and Best Wishes for 2015

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    Christmas Card

    Image from ELP Advisors

    It’s time to close the books on 2014.  In addition to looking at big data, small lending, and slow, slow internet service, we’d like to end the year with thanks and good wishes.  We’re grateful for the economic growth and opportunities that have blessed this country, for our amazing staff, our families and loved ones and the return of rain to California.  We wish you a healthy, prosperous 2015 filled with learning, laughter and love!

  3. Metro Los Angeles County Crowdsourcing Bike Share Map

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    Image from killerturnip: https://www.flickr.com/photos/70044955@N00/11526752666/

    As Metro continues its efforts to build a countywide bike share program, the agency recently released a new crowdsourcing map that identifies communities that may be primed for bike share due to various factors (e.g., population and employment density, job and trip attractors, topography, bicycle infrastructure, community support, and funding availability). Metro is asking members of the public to suggest neighborhoods or cities in the County that may be good locations for a future bike share program. (more…)

  4. SANDAG Regional Transportation Plan Thrown Out

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    Image from WSDOT: https://www.flickr.com/photos/wsdot/14826544779/

    On November 24th, a state appeals court rejected SANDAG’s 2050 Regional Transportation Plan because it does not adequately consider the environmental impacts of future traffic projects and, therefore, does not comply with regulations set forth by SB 375. The 2-1 decision cited the lack of details on how future transportation projects may affect climate change and regional air quality – and went on to state that the plan failed “to offer ways to address those problems.(more…)

  5. La Plaza Cultura Village Unanimously Approved by LA County Board of Supervisors

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    LA Plaza

    La Plaza Cultura Village Unanimously Approved by LA County Board of Supervisors:

    ELP Advisors is proud to announce that LA Plaza de Cultura y Artes Foundation is partnering with Trammell Crow Company and the Cesar Chavez Foundation to develop two LA County-owned parking lots directly adjacent to the Foundation’s museum and within walking distance from Union Station. (more…)

  6. Los Angeles Diaspora Forum

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    Image from NASA Goddard Space Flight Center: https://www.flickr.com/photos/24662369@N07/4392965590/

    Image from NASA Goddard Space Flight Center: https://www.flickr.com/photos/24662369@N07/4392965590/

    On October 15, 2014 the North American Integration and Development (NAID) Center at the University of California Los Angeles hosted the Los Angeles Diaspora Forum. The forum is one of 65 events throughout the world that are part of Global Diaspora Week. The global event is sponsored by the International Diaspora Engagement Alliance (IDEA), an organization that since 2011 continues to provide a space to discuss the impact of international development. (more…)

  7. Meet the new class of Women’s Policy Institute fellows

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    Women's Policy

    ELP Advisors is proud to announce that our very own Cynthia Guzman, was selected for the Women’s Foundation of California’s Women’s Policy Institute’s (WPI) fellowship program. The leadership of WPI fellows has led to 23 laws being passed over the program’s 12 year history.  The program works with grassroots women leaders from across the state to craft and advocate for policies that will positively affect the lives of low income Californians. (more…)

  8. Growing the Garden of Collective Impact

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    Image from Mosman Council

    Image from Mosman Council

    I love garden metaphors. (What’s not to love?) In food policy work, it’s too easy and fun to talk about the “seeds” of health we are planting or how we are “cultivating justice” or “cultivating community.” Or the “fruits of our labor,” or “growing the soil” of capacity that will allow our good work to “grow.” See what I mean? Garden metaphors for days! One of my favorite garden metaphors is lesser known. Permaculture, a branch of ecological design, espouses the concept that, “everything gardens.” The idea is that in a healthy habitat, every plant, shrub and tree, and every sentient being, provides some life support to the other residents of the garden. Whether providing shade, soil nutrients or fertilizer, everything in the garden acts as “gardener” for something else. So thrives a vibrant ecosystem.

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  9. An Old “New” Tool to Promote Equitable, Resilient, and Inclusive Development

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    On September 29, 2014 Governor Brown Signed SB 628, the Enhanced Infrastructure Financing District (EIFD) bill. In many circles, the bill has been touted as redevelopment 2.0. And, in fact, many of the provisions of the bill are reminiscent of old-school redevelopment. But unlike the redevelopment of yore, there aren’t any requirements for the inclusion of affordable housing, so there are concerns that this new financing mechanism will only speed the rising tide of gentrification in our cities. So how can local governments use enhanced infrastructure financing districts to promote equitable, resilient, and inclusive developments? (more…)

  10. Piloting a New Route to a Four Year Degree

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    Image from Bart Everson

    Image from Bart Everson

    In September, Governor Brown signed a bill that would allow some of California Community Colleges to offer four-year bachelor’s degrees as part of a pilot program. This pilot has the potential to fundamentally shift the way that California’s public higher education system operates, and promises to broaden opportunities for low-income and rural Californians to access college. But what kinds of programs will be offered, and what details still need to be worked out? (more…)