Archive: Jun 2014

  1. The Blue Edition

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    Summer has arrived and World Cup madness has gripped ELP Advisors along with most of the populated world. Images of sweat-drenched futbolers make us thirsty and remind us of that precious resource we cannot live without — one that we must manage more carefully in our increasingly hot and crowded urbanscapes. So we’ve devoted this month’s edition to the various challenges and opportunities posed by what some have called the blue economy.  Whether it’s finding new ways to finance green stormwater infrastructure or accelerating our water recycling efforts, regions and localities continue to innovate to wring the most out of every drop.  As you raise a refreshing glass to toast Team USA, let’s also applaud another on-time budget for California – something that seemed miraculous just a few short years ago. Miracles do happen.  Got that, Germany?

    Sincerely yours,

    Cecilia V. Estolano | Jennifer LeSar | Katherine A. Perez-Estolano

  2. The Storm Next Time

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    Image from Washington State Dept of Transportation: https://www.flickr.com/photos/wsdot/5455957937/in/photostream/

    Image from Washington State Dept of Transportation: https://www.flickr.com/photos/wsdot/5455957937/in/photostream/

    The issue of how to pay for dealing with stormwater runoff into the Santa Monica Bay has begun to engulf all urbanized areas in Los Angeles County. While the impacts are most acutely felt by coastal cities such as Santa Monica and Hermosa Beach, inland cities are grappling with how to manage urban runoff. Recent court decisions found Los Angeles County liable for stormwater pollution in the San Gabriel and Los Angeles Rivers. The latest ruling simply underscores the reality that all municipalities, regardless of their proximity to the coast, will be required to be more proactive in stormwater management. So how do we finance stormwater infrastructure improvements with limited funding for infrastructure projects? (more…)

  3. Preserving Scarce Water Resources

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    In the midst of the worst statewide drought in centuries surprisingly few Californians have reported that the drought has “personally affected them to a major degree.” Although drinking supplies in some rural communities are being threatened, many of the state’s major urban centers have yet to impose stringent water use restrictions. And, in water-starved Southern California, water managers are cautiously optimistic about the region’s ability to weather the drought. But how did Southern California, which historically relies on a large share of imported water, become so drought-tolerant? And, if limited water supplies are the new normal, what more needs to be done to keep our pipes flowing? (more…)

  4. The Blue Economy

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    Image from Marion Doss: https://www.flickr.com/photos/ooocha/3066497077/in/photolist-d6YBYy-bEcg33-bSEqJK-5uSh1J-bDLcjY-bDKGdh-bSEpjr-bDKH17-bDKHVb-bSEVj2-bSEVni-bDKyLu-bDLccs-5FdzoB-97BMFB-5EnKQB-bT6ZvK-bEcg65-5F3TRN-eBYeBu-9ZX5mx-5FfS6C-5Fbzi4-5Fbzjp-5FfS8f-5F3UQU-5EYAKg-eFswyp-eFswEF-eFyDuC-5FhY1f-5Fi64d-aD2zBC-drdkLy-5FfScd-9Zg3z4-ejpjF-fp43nk-frcRMa-5Es6pb-frsaU3-fm74Eu-frs8LW-fm74Lm-frs7mS-frs85u-fkRTb2-fkRThp-fkRTmZ-5DGURj

    Image from Marion Doss: link

    With over half of the world’s surface covered by water, and over ninety percent of the world’s freight transported over ocean, it is no surprise that the oft-overlooked maritime sector is of critical importance to the global economy.  With the expansion of the Panama Canal, ports all over the U.S. are updating their existing infrastructure and technology to accommodate the ginormous container ships that are soon coming our way. However, no two local maritime economies are alike.

    (more…)

  5. Submerged Cities

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    “A picture is worth a thousand words” –  or so the adage goes. Many who watched Al Gore’s PowerPoint presentation in “An Inconvenient Truth” remember the aerial simulations showing the rising seas engulfing major metropolitan areas, including Shanghai and Florida. Now the artist and researcher Nickolay Lamm, using mapping data provided by Climate Central, has created stunning images of iconic locations after 12 feet of sea level rise from a bird’s eye view. You decide if the adage applies.

  6. New Report on Los Angeles’ Green Job Market

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    Image from Department of Energy Solar Decathlon: https://www.flickr.com/photos/solar_decathlon/6164118692/in/photostream/

    Image from Department of Energy Solar Decathlon: https://www.flickr.com/photos/solar_decathlon/6164118692/in/photostream/

    The Los Angeles Cleantech Incubator (LACI) and the California Center for Sustainable Energy (CCSE) have issued a report on Los Angeles’ green job market and the need for clean tech industry job training. Funding for the research and workforce analysis was provided by the Union Bank Foundation, which supports green job training and placement. (more…)

  7. Most Walkable Urban Cities

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    Smart Growth America has released a report ranking the nation’s most walkable cities. Large urban centers that are traditionally thought of as pedestrian-oriented cities topped the list, with Washington, D.C., New York, and Boston rounding out the top three. Los Angeles, with a total of 54 “walkable urban places” ranked number 18 on the list of 30 metropolitan areas. The report also accounted for projects underway that will increase walkability. Including those projects, LA moves up to the number 11 slot. For more details, check out the report [PDF].